A recent survey carried out by Lloyds and Schroders identified that nearly one in five people would prefer a visit to the dentist than a visit to their financial planner.  

We all know the benefits to our health of visiting our dentist regularly, but what about the benefits to our finances or wealth of visiting a financial planner?  It seems that the financial planning profession needs to do much more work to make visiting your financial planner more palatable than the regular trip you schedule to your dentist!  

In the survey, over a quarter of those people asked said they would feel uncomfortable seeing a financial planner.  While a financial planner might not have their hands in your mouth, perhaps there is some concern about the impact of a visit to them on your wallet!  

In reality, financial planners will be going to great lengths to make your experience of visiting them more enjoyable than painful.  Not only will they have spent a great deal of time attaining the level of professional qualifications required of them to advise you but they will also have spent considerable energy understanding how best to communicate with you in an understandable and non-painful manner.  After all, they will want to be encouraging a long-term relationship; they will want you to be seeing them regularly.  

Visiting a dentist will mean good oral hygiene as well as an engaging smile.  Visiting a financial planner will also have substantial benefits, mostly around your ability to live the life that you want to live.  

The financial planner will help you to understand what you can get from life by effectively employing all of your financial resources.  

Experience tells us that the first meeting we have with our clients may well be slightly nervous. However, by the end of theDiscovery Meeting,” most clients will realise that the financial planner has their best financial interests at heart.  

Financial planners can help you answer some of life’s most important questions, such as;  

  • When will I be able to retire and never run out of money? 
  • Will I be able to help my children or grandchildren onto the property ladder through gifting them money or lending it to them? 
  • How will I be able to cope if I need later long-term care? 
  • Am I taking too much or indeed to little risk with my money? 

Just as the dentist is likely to ask you the question, as you sit down in the chair for the first time, “Have you had any problems with your teeth?”, the financial planner will also be armed with questions such as; 

  • What do you want to achieve with your life? 
  • How much will it cost you to achieve those things? 
  • Are you going to do this now and if not now when?  

Like the dentist, the financial planner will deliver the best possible service to you especially if you remember, prevention is better than the cure and, you meet regularly for a wealth check-up.